My Homemade Kimchi

Looking so delicious!

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Shiratama Dango

Served with a side of sweet red beans, Shiratama dango, these chewy little dumplings are a very traditional treat. We eat them with shaved ice with sweet red beans, a sweet red beans warm soup dessert or just with Kinako, ground roasted soybeans. So yummy! You can also try with melted butter and brown sugar or Maple syrup to be Canadian Style dessert!

 Shiratama Dango (makes about 20 small balls)

100g Shiratama ko

About 100cc (6-7tbsp) Water

2-3 tbsp Kinako, ground roasted soybeans

2-3 tbsp Sugar

  1. Get prepped: Set a large, deep pot of water to boil, and prepare a large bowl of cold water.
  2.  Make the dough: In a bowl, add 4-5 Tbsp cold water to shiratamako and mix with your fingers. Continue to add water bit by bit and knead until the dough is soft and pliable (we say until it is the softness of an earlobe). Add more mochiko or water as you need it. The dough should be soft, but not sticky.
  3. Form: Pinch off small pieces of the dough and roll into small balls about 2cm in diameter. Using your index finger, make a little indention in the center.
  4.  Boil dango: When the water is at a boil, drop in the shiratama dango one by one (so that they don’t stick) and boil until they float up to the top of the water. About 2-3 minutes. (This is why you need a deep pot of water, so that you can see the difference between a sunken and floating dumpling).
  5.  Cool: Remove cooked dango with a slotted spoon and drop into an cold water bath until cooled. Drain well.

 Serve at room temperature with Kinako or your favorite toppings.

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Cooking Demo at Terra Nova Barn Kitchen

 

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I had a wonderful opportunity to host the cooking demo for City of Richmond at the very beautiful Terra Nova Barn Kitchen last night. I felt such an honor to be there surrounded with wonderful guests.

Richmond has a special place in my heart. I was born and raised in Wakayama Japan. Richmond and Wakayama have a long history as Sister Cities. My husband was raised in Richmond and we met while I was working in Richmond.

After the class, I had a chance to walk the garden and what a beautiful place that I didn’t even know existed. I felt a peace and joy looking at all gardens and the vegetables and flowers are sharing their energy with me.